Tuesday, May 18, 2010

Affect, Rhetoric, Society

Is affect a product of how we talk about ourselves? Consider one particular shift I've observed lately. It is a new orthodoxy that while men can maintain friendships with each other, women are constantly at one another's throats. This implies a certain emotional intelligence, suggesting that while men can live and let live, roll with the punches, and suss out each other's true meanings. Women, by contrast, are "catty," shallow, mutually destructive . . .

2 comments:

Meryl said...

Do I even need to type what I'm going to say to this? I could make the same generalizations from certain patterns I've observed in men. Anecdotal evidence does not make for universal conclusions, my friend. And you know it, so I shouldn't have to tell you.

David Z. Morris said...

Ah, I think I was misunderstood here - the risks of the half-formed idea as blog post. I was talking about social discourses of gender identity, not their reality. Figured that would go without saying.